The Wee Garden

That’s how I see my garden, wee, my small attempt to bring some amount of homegrown produce to the table.  I’ve made small gardening attempts many times in my life, with limited success.  Many of those attempts were made in the backyards of places where I rented and usually consisted of your standard tomato and melons plants.  Back in those crunchy granola hippie days, I even participated in a few co-op gardens, though I quickly grew disgruntled with the shared garden experience.  You see, in one of these co-op gardens, I had planted some broccoli in my plot, which I loved and tended religiously until the plants began to prepare for production. The Big House One day while I was at work, and much to my dismay, this over zealous, Birkenstock wearing, twirly skirt, nymph-like girl, thought my broccoli plants were “done” and promptly plucked them all from their warm cozy earth beds and tossed them about the garden to spend their final moments baking in the sun.  Then there was the garden at the Big House, which actually produced enough tomatoes, onions and peppers to make and can several jars of salsa for the winter.  That was sweet.  Then I moved to Florida and that was followed by many failed garden attempts due partly to the salt air, harsh sun and lack of ‘growing in my region’ knowledge.

Well, here I am today having lived in Florida for 10 years, reading up on the demise of civilization as we know it, concerned about food scarcity and quality and wanting desperately to do something to make it all better. I mentioned previously in another post that I had purchased some Earth Boxes and a compost bin and that I had successfully grown some Cherokee purple heirlooms in the boxes. They rocked, BTW.  Earth Boxes w/ lettuceI have 3 boxes.  One is still over flowing with banana and purple peppers that just won’t give up.  I probably have about 20-30 peppers out there now, ready to be picked.  In the other 2 boxes, I have planted mesclun and romaine.  Both boxes appear to be doing well, though their little lettuce leaves are so small and fragile it makes me wonder how in the world I could feed a family with my little hobby garden.  I sense the gravity of the world food situation right here in my little yard and it’s frightening.

My next venture (since I have gained a sense of confidence that I can indeed grow food) is to build a more permanent raised bed.  I’m going to relocate the anise shrubs in front of the bamboo fence further left, then build the bed at the base of the fence.  anise shrubsThere are so many things to consider: of what is the best material to build the beds, where will the soil come from, potential pests, storm protection, Mosquito Control’s regular spraying, what are the best things to plant and where.  Decisions, decisions.  I suppose it would be helpful to decide what it is I want to accomplish with my garden.  Supplementing our regular vegetable purchases, oh wait, that’s basically re-stating what I wrote at the beginning of this post.  Feeding a community in the event of a crisis seems like a daunting task at the moment, so I’ll keep it simple for now and just learn to tend the wee garden the best I can.  We have to start somewhere and that’s often the hardest part of turning the tide. 

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5 thoughts on “The Wee Garden

  1. who was that hippie that did that to your poor broccoli?!

    i’m glad you have your hands in the earth these days. do let me know about your satifaction wtih the earth boxes.

    again, this year, i didn’t plant, thinking we were moving. now i’m bummed. i miss those years when mina was younger and we had such huge gardens that fed us almost year round. i look forward to that again soon.

  2. i’m just now catching up on your blog (when i should be doing other things, of course) and there was lots to catch up on. you have to read the blog “10 signs like these” (get it on my site, i’m too lazy to make a link). you will LOVE it.

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