CPAP: Living With It or Not

mRNA Appliance & CPAP Update

The mRNA appliance is actually kind of awesome. I can feel it “doing something” which equates to meaningful change toward a permanent solution to my sleep apnea among other things. This past week, in addition to being able to breath through my nose for the first time in my life, my husband has declared my snoring to be just a soft purr or something like that. This is all improvement before starting CPAP. I still can’t tell much difference looking in the mirror, but my lower jaw is now freely moving forward and I can “feel” my top dental arch taking on a fuller shape. Continue reading

Are You A Chronic Smiler?

RBFResting bitch face is my new default facial expression. You’re probably wondering why or you could care less because you don’t know me. Take a look at this post where I’m smiling. I’ve been a chronic smiler my whole life. I never gave it much thought before, though I’ve definitely been mistaken for not being serious. For someone who’s run through bouts of depression and extreme social anxiety, I think it was my way of showing the world everything was alright. Now I’m beginning to wonder if there was something deeper at play. I’ll explain.

This will all tie back into epigenetic orthodontics, you’ll see. Continue reading

Mouth Breathing, Sleep Apnea, and Depression

mRNA Update

My research on Epigenetic Orthodontics has led me down a deep rabbit hole, but first, an appliance update. I’m now into week three of wearing the mRNA appliance and I’ll be picking up my APAP machine next week. I have mixed feelings about that which I’ll explain later. My teeth have shifted enough now that I can almost touch the two front and bottom teeth together for the first time since my twenties. There is still pressure in the roof of my mouth and breathing through both nostrils is now a regular event.

Quantifying Genetic & Environmental Influences

I want to share some of the information I’ve come across recently on epigenetic orthodontics, mouth breathing, and related health issues. Continue reading

Epigenetic Orthodontics in Panama City Beach

The decision to undergo palate expansion took me by surprise. I decided to find a dentist or orthodontist who would devise a non-invasive treatment for my situation after I felt certain that holistic dentistry was a viable option. My online searching led me to most any major city and no one within a 250 mile radius. I surmised this would probably be considered alternative treatment, so, paying out of pocket. This was going to take serious future planning. In the meantime, I still needed to see a dentist for basic care. I decided to visit the closest dentist to my house. I had heard positive things about her and her staff. She calls her office The Dental Spa. What’s not to like? Continue reading

mRNA Appliance One Week Update

I’ve been wearing the mRNA appliance for one week now. I wear it the recommended 14-16 hours per day. I’m not speaking any better, though I’m getting used to talking. My sleeping is good and bad. Some nights I sleep well and some nights I toss and turn. No different from usual. My tossing and turning could be just as easily attributed to my monkey brain not turning off.

There is no visible difference yet, though two unusual and unexpected things happened this week. While I was eating, I thought I bit into a rock. It was my tooth. The teeth in the back are starting to make contact in new and different ways and it was a weird sensation to actually be able to use more teeth to chew food.

The second thing that happened was that I noticed I could breath through my right nostril for the first time in my life. In the past, when my sinuses were clear, I could push air through my right nostril, but I could never breath through that nostril. I’m noticing every day now that I can breath full breaths with both nostrils. It’s quite miraculous.

Note: I asked my dentist how much they were going to try to expand my palate. She said that the normal distance between the rear molars is 38-42 mm and mine is 30 mm. From what I’ve been reading, it seems 6-8 mm is the maximum that an adult palate can be expanded. What is normal is also relevant as the human jaw structure has changed over time.

Why Palate Expansion as a Treatment Option – Part II

Now that I’ve shared some of my current and past medical history, it’s time to share the other piece that led me down this path.

Hippy Days

At the age of 19, I discovered another way of existing in this world that resonated with me deeply. I started hanging out with a bunch of hippies. I had my punk rock friends too, but for some reason, through “health food”, homeopathy, homeschooling, Dead shows, and the like, I felt like I had found my tribe. I was convinced and it was further enforced for the next thirty years that being a vegetarian was the righteous path. I ate tofu, beans, and rice religiously, drank rice milk, learned to make my own bread, and seitan. Of course I eschewed junk food and loaded up on veggies and inferior proteins for years. I wasn’t a strict vegetarian, because I still craved meat like crazy. Continue reading

Why Palate Expansion as a Treatment Option – Part I

How did I arrive at palate expansion as a treatment I wanted to undergo?

This was the result of extensive information gathering and seeking the most holistic approach to my health care as possible. I’ll do my best to describe the conditions that I’ve found myself afflicted with over the years and at present.

Early Medical History

At the age of four, I was diagnosed with asthma and allergies to mold, soy, pollen, pet dander, dust, and lots of other things I don’t remember. To further compound my breathing issues, in my teens I was told that I had a deviated septum. Bronchitis, strep throat, and walking pneumonia were my seasonal companions. In my twenties, I was able to get the asthma and allergies under control with the assistance of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Continue reading